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Element Granola

Element Granola


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Sweet, crunchy granola is delicious, but store-bought varieties can sometimes be loaded with calories and added sugar. This recipe from ELEMENT snacks, using their non-GMO, gluten-free, chocolate-dipped rice cakes, makes this tasty treat guilt-free, too.

Click here for more of our best granola recipes.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup raw, shelled pumpkin seeds
  • 1 Cup dried cherries
  • 3 dark chocolate-dipped rice cakes (such as Element rice cakes), chopped into small pieces
  • 1 Tablespoon dried pomegranate seeds (optional)
  • 1/8 Teaspoon cayenne (optional)
  • 1 Tablespoon extra-virgin coconut oil
  • 1 Tablespoon maple syrup, grade B
  • Pinch of salt

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Mix all the ingredients except the rice cakes together in a large bowl to distribute them evenly, and then pour the mixture out onto a parchment-lined cookie sheet. Spread into one even layer and bake for 20 minutes.

Let the granola cook completely and then break it apart. Add the rice cakes to the cooled mixture.

Nutritional Facts

Servings4

Calories Per Serving382

Folate equivalent (total)25µg6%


Easy Gluten Free and Nut Free Granola

This gluten free and nut free granola recipe makes the perfect crunchy and chewy granola to top your smoothie bowls, sprinkle over ice cream, or just eat by the handful!

Free from: wheat/gluten, dairy, casein, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, coconut, corn, soy, fish, shellfish, sesame, lupin, mustard, dyes

Granola has always been a mystery to me. Having so many allergies, I wasn’t able to ever grab a bag of granola at the store to safely enjoy, so I didn’t get what all the hype was about. But since I have a bag of gluten free rolled oats in my pantry, I decided to see what was so good about this snack

What I ended up with was a recipe that was simple in form and complex on taste. It is crispy and chewy in all the good ways, slightly sweet, has a pinch of salt to deepen the flavor profile, and has all the yummy granola clusters that you will fight over who gets to eat. Plus, this is super budget friendly. I don’t know if you noticed by store-bought granola is expensive!

Once you try this homemade gluten free and nut free granola, you won’t want to go back to store bought again!

Full disclosure: This post contains affiliate links and you may view my full disclosure by clicking here.


What’s healthy when it comes to granola?

This recipe came about because our son Larson loves granola with his yogurt every morning. Alex and I realized that so many brands and recipes out there are too full of sugar and oil. Many recipes are also high calorie. Some of them are 500 calories per 1/2 cup serving! Our goal for making a healthy granola recipe was to stay around 200 calories per serving. The following tricks helped us to create a nutrient-rich healthy granola that met our calorie goal:

  • Puffed rice is a great way to add texture to a granola using a low calorie whole grain ! Puffed rice is actually a minimally processed whole food: it’s simply rice that’s been puffed so that it’s crunchy. You should be able to find puffed rice cereal at your local grocery store.
  • Lowering the ratio of nuts helps reduce the calories in a healthy granola. It’s just the right amount of nuts to be a texture contrast and pack the granola with protein, but not so much that it overwhelms the granola.
  • Reduced oil and maple syrup versus other granola recipes also helps to reduce the calories and sugar. Together, all these components work out to make a delicious and healthy granola recipe!


Recipe Summary

  • 8 cups rolled oats
  • 1 ½ cups wheat germ
  • 1 ½ cups oat bran
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup finely chopped almonds
  • 1 cup finely chopped pecans
  • 1 cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • ¾ cup honey
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups raisins or sweetened dried cranberries

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment or aluminum foil.

Combine the oats, wheat germ, oat bran, sunflower seeds, almonds, pecans, and walnuts in a large bowl. Stir together the salt, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey, oil, cinnamon, and vanilla in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then pour over the dry ingredients, and stir to coat. Spread the mixture out evenly on the baking sheets.

Bake in the preheated oven until crispy and toasted, about 20 minutes. Stir once halfway through. Cool, then stir in the raisins or cranberries before storing in an airtight container.


What you’ll need

Homemade granola (or you may know it as toasted muesli) is a bunch of simple ingredients, mixed together in a bowl, then baked.

  • Oats (2): I use whole rolled oats in mine to keep it super chunky but you can use half and half rolled oats and quick oats too.
  • Sweetener: This recipe uses brown sugar (3) and honey (1). You can swap these for things like coconut sugar and maple syrup respectively.
  • Nuts and seeds: Perfect for adding some crunch, I use almonds (6) and pepitas (pumpkin seeds) (8) in this recipe but feel free to use your favourites. Chop larger nuts into small pieces.
  • Flavourings: A little vanilla (4) and a touch of cinnamon (9) work perfectly with the honey..
  • Sea salt flakes (10): Just a touch to balance the sweetness and give a little salty kick from time to time.
  • Oil (5): I use a little rice bran oil but you can use canola or coconut oil too.
  • Dried fruit (7): The chewiness of the dried cranberries round out the textural elements.

Check out my easy maple granola for loads more substitution ideas.


Recipe Summary

  • 8 cups rolled oats
  • 1 ½ cups wheat germ
  • 1 ½ cups oat bran
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup finely chopped almonds
  • 1 cup finely chopped pecans
  • 1 cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • ¾ cup honey
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups raisins or sweetened dried cranberries

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment or aluminum foil.

Combine the oats, wheat germ, oat bran, sunflower seeds, almonds, pecans, and walnuts in a large bowl. Stir together the salt, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey, oil, cinnamon, and vanilla in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then pour over the dry ingredients, and stir to coat. Spread the mixture out evenly on the baking sheets.

Bake in the preheated oven until crispy and toasted, about 20 minutes. Stir once halfway through. Cool, then stir in the raisins or cranberries before storing in an airtight container.


Homemade Sweet and Salty Paleo Granola

I am the newest advocate for homemade granola. What better way to know what is going into your food than to make it at home yourself? And the best part is that granola is fairly easy to make. And admittedly kind of fun when it gets all stuck to your fingers and you get to lick it off. This sweet and salty combination is great to keep around for a snack or as a substitute for your morning cereal.


If you get tired of eating eggs every morning, this grain-free granola is delicious with some coconut or almond milk. I also eat granola as a snack, when I need some energy during the slow hours of the afternoon. It is packed with healthy fats and protein, keeping you fuller, longer. It is hard to beat in nutritional value.

When making granola at home, I really like the element of knowing exactly what is in it. I would rather not spend 15 extra minutes at the grocery store reading the back of every package to see the ingredient list. Also, I don’t know about you, but somehow they always add in one thing that I don’t like and would have to pick out. For me, it’s the extra large dried cherries. Now I completely avoid that and just put all of my favorite things (cashews, almonds, cranberries) into the mix. Go crazy in the bulk bins aisle. With homemade granola, you get to pick the flavors and exact content. If you want something warmer, you can also add vanilla or cinnamon – perfect granola for the fall.


Don’t skip the step of roasting everything in the oven. The nuts come out beautifully browned and the coconut flakes get nice and toasted. I usually make it in bulk and then store it in either a resealable plastic bag or an airtight container. This is such a simple and easy snack option that does not take very much time to make. Try it for yourself!


Ovenderful by Simran Oberoi

Do you like a bread that is flavourful? I know that sounds like a strange question because who doesn’t like that.

But most people still go on and use store bought breads which not only lack flavour but also the right nutritive value. And then we go ahead and blame baked goods for ill-health. We have the knowledge to make discerning choices. We have the access to ingredients that were never available earlier. How about becoming a conscious baker and consumer first?

I am about to start a session about healthy baking and this recipe below already has three ingredients that I am explaining from an immunity boosting and healthy baking perspective.

It is a breakfast I have enjoyed on many mornings. Quietly absorbing the flavours and the goodness of powerful clean ingredients, when peace and quiet prevails, and only the birds are interested in what I might be doing sitting by myself on the verandah swing.

Usually you do not find breads baked with jaggery powder but if you find beautiful and intense, locally sourced organic jaggery powder that should be your yeast activator – which is why I used WellBe’s Jaggery Powder for my homebaked Khapli Wheat Loaf.

Healthy baking has a fourth element to it apart from the flour, sweetener and fat. That one factor which ups its nutrition quotient. And I always try to keep that intact in my bakes. So for this bread too – my secret is to add the Moringa powder from Wellbe. It blends in seamlessly and adds that fourth dimension to make my bake complete.

Have a look at the detailed recipe here and tag @sim_ovenderful and @wellbefoods when you try it!


Ingredients

1 3/4 cups (175g) certified gluten free old-fashioned rolled oats, processed by about half in a food processor

1 cup (120g) certified gluten free oat flour

3/4 cup (164g) packed light brown sugar (or granulated coconut palm sugar)

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 1/3 cups (160g) raw pecans, almonds and/or pumpkin seeds, roughly chopped

1 cup (about 80g) coconut chips

8 ounces mini chocolate chips, dried raisins and/or dried cranberries or other small dried fruit

8 tablespoons (112g) unsalted butter or virgin coconut oil, melted and cooled

6 tablespoons (126 g) combination of honey, pure maple syrup and/or molasses (I like to use 2 tablespoons of each)

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell), lightly beaten

1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract


This Trick Helps Homemade Granola Stick Together

The best granolas are the ones that come in large clusters, don’t @ me. While many brands of packaged granola have extremely satisfying chunks, when you make it at home, it often crumbles into what can only be described as toasted oats. Of course it’s still edible, tasty even, but it won’t be as satisfying as biting into a big ol’ cluster. I’ll be honest: I’ve tried out a lot (a lot) of granola recipes and honestly thought those clumps were just an elusive thing that either happened or did not based on the imperceptible changes in oven temperature and/or mystical spirits in the kitchen. This is not the case. The answer is lurking in both a binding agent and in the way you lay the granola on the sheet pan.

The first element in ensuring that the oats and seeds and whatever else you put in your granola will stick to together is an ingredient that will bind the mixture together. I’ve tried mixing an egg white into the batter, and it worked alright. I tried whipping an egg white and folding that into a batch and that worked pretty well. Neither one worked really well—my results were both very delicate clusters that mostly feel apart when picked up. Less than ideal. They did, however, produce clumpier results than when I used no egg at all.


Watch the video: HQ Vitas - The 7th Element 2001 (May 2022).