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The 8 Coolest Vintage Beer Labels Ever

The 8 Coolest Vintage Beer Labels Ever


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We wish these were still around

They don’t make them like they used to.

A common misconception about collecting vintage items is it will do major damage to your wallet. Some antiques go for a crazy amount of cash, but this isn’t the case for many vintage beer labels — many of which are beautifully designed and perfect for displaying in your kitchen or man cave. Beer lovers, rejoice!

Click here for The 8 Coolest Vintage Beer Labels Ever

Whether you’re looking for a pale ale, an Irish stout, or a holiday blend, websites like EBay allow you to purchase some totally cool labels for low prices.

New to the world of vintage beer? Or do you consider yourself to be a total expert? It probably doesn’t matter. If the label is from before the 2000s or if the product is no longer available for purchase, it’s probably more unique than what you have lying around the house. We’ve rounded up a list of vintage beer labels that we believe will spice up your collection.

Golden Gate California Beer Lot Collection, 1950, $29.95

Itching for a California getaway? Not only will this beer label bring you back to the ‘50s, it also provided a scenic view of the Golden Gate Bridge with each sip. This label is one-of-a-kind.

Golden Pheasant Sebewaing Beer, $1.00

Doesn’t “Golden Pheasant” sound elite? We think there should be more beer names out there like this one. This label would be a sleek and glossy addition to your collection.


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"


10 Award-Winning Home Brew Recipes

We asked the members of the New York City Homebrewers Guild, one of the nation's oldest home-brew clubs, to share some of the recipes that have been successful in competitions. We got back 10 killer concoctions representing a wide variety of beer styles and brewing methods. (Note: For definitions of some of the specialty jargon, check the glossary and tips at the end.)

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Scottish wee-heavy
Competition results: Won first place in the strong ales category in the Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews (2001)

Extract recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.120
Final gravity: 1.030
Bitterness: 32 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 9.5 percent

15 pounds light dry malt extract
16 ounces 55-degree Lovibond crystal malt
4 ounces chocolate malt
4 ounces peat-smoked malt
2.25 ounces black malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (10 percent AA), 60 minutes

Steep the grains in 1 gallon of 150-degree F water for 30 minutes. Sparge with 1 gallon of 150 F water. Add 1 gallon water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and the Dry Malt Extract. Bring to boil, stirring regularly. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer hop pellets.

Boil for 60 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove from heat and cool. Add to fermenting bucket/carboy and top off to 5 gallons with cold water.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch two activator packs of Wyeast 1728 Scottish ale yeast. Aerate again 12 hours later. Let ferment at 60 F for two weeks. Let it sit at 60 F four more weeks. Prime with 1/2 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle and sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: "Ridiculously over the top and too big for style. More please!"

Brewer: Phil Clarke Jr.
Style: Extra special bitter
Competition results: Placed second in a combined category of English pale ales, German wheat and rye ales, and sour ales at the 2006 Knickerbocker Battle of the Brews

All-grain recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.052
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 44 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 percent

7.75 pounds British two-row pale malt
.45 pounds Carahell malt
.68 pounds Victory malt
.45 pounds flaked barley
.83 pounds 40-degree Lovibond caramel malt
1 ounce Northern Brewer hops (4.8 percent AA), 60 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Fuggle hops (4.8 percent AA), 1 minute

Mash the grain (cracked) in 16 quarts of water at 150 degrees F for 60 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon gypsum to water. Sparge until wort reaches a gravity of 1.010 (about 6.5 to 7 gallons). Boil wort, stirring occasionally, until batch reaches a volume of 5.75 gallons. Add 1 ounce of Northern Brewer hop pellets and boil for 60 minutes, adding 1 ounce of Fuggle hops with 10 minutes left in the boil, and another with 1 minute left in the boil. Remove from heat and cool to 70 F.

Fermentation: Aerate well and pitch one activator pack of Wyeast 1084 Irish ale yeast. Let ferment at 70 F for one week. Rack to secondary and let sit at 70 F two more weeks. Prime with 7/8 cup of honey, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water. Bottle. Sample after six weeks.

Judges' notes: Strong malty backbone makes this beer stand out.

Brewers: Ray Girard and Lee Jacobson
Style: American pale ale
Competition results: First place in the American ale category at the 2010 Hudson Valley Homebrew Competition

All-grain recipe, 6-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.053
Final gravity: 1.013
Bitterness: 40 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 5.3 percent

9 pounds American two-row malt
1 pound wheat malt
1 pound crystal 40L malt
1 pound Munich malt
0.5 pound Victory malt

1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 20 minutes
.5 ounces Amarillo hops (8.5 percent AA), 10 minutes
.5 ounces Centennial hops (10 percent AA), 10 minutes
1 ounce Columbus hops (14 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Centennial hops, 0 minutes (meaning add this at the same time the flame under the boiling wort is turned off)
1 ounce Amarillo hops, 0 minutes

Mash at 152 degrees F. Boil 60 minutes

Fermentation: Ferment at 68 F with Wyeast 1056. Let it drop clear, because the beer will be harsh until it does, as a lot of resins bind the yeast. Carbonate to 2.5 volumes. Drink while fresh.

Brewer's notes: This scored something ridiculous like 45 points (out of 50). It has a lot of hop flavor without a lot of bitterness it balances big hop flavor with big maltiness. No traditional bittering hops, all hop-bursted (large amounts of hops added late in the boil). It's probably more aggressive than a classic example, but very drinkable (if you like hops).

Brewers: Jacques Alcabes and Mathias Willner
Style: Rye saison with brettanomyces
Competition results: Third place in the Belgian specialty ale category of Homebrew Alley 6 (2012)

Partial-mash recipe, 5-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.065
Final gravity: 1.015
Bitterness: 31.5 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 6.7 percent

3 pounds rye malt
2.5 pounds Belgian pilsner malt
1 pound brown Belgian candi sugar
0.5 pounds CaraWheat Malt
3.5 pounds extra-light dry malt extract
0.75 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 50 minutes
1 ounce East Kent Golding hops (5.7 percent AA), 15 minutes
.5 ounces Chinook hops (14.1 percent AA), 2 minutes

2 vials of White Labs WLP565 Belgian Saison I Ale
1 vial of White Labs WLP650 Brettanomyces Bruxellensis
2 packs (WLP565) in primary fermentation but no yeast starter. Rocked carboy. Yeast nutrient and whirlfloc tablet for last 10 minutes of the boil.
1 pack of WLP650 in secondary

Mash grains for 60 minutes at 150 degree F, and boil wort for 90 minutes.

Fermentation: Pitch two vials of White Labs WLP565 yeast, rock the fermenter to aerate, and ferment for 3 weeks before racking to secondary and adding Brettanomyces and 2 ounces of oak that have been soaking in rye whiskey for about a week. (Also dump in the rye.) Allow eight weeks for secondary fermentation before kegging or bottling.

Brewer's notes: The idea was to try to get something spicy and funky, as if you had licked the side of a horse stable for some reason, but it turned out to be cleaner than expected. The yeasts worked well together, and with the rye and oak no single flavor was too overpowering. Adding the brettanomyces after primary fermentation limited the funk to a more modest level. To me, this type of experimental beer is about two things. One, starting with a unique idea and an interesting flavor profile to develop. And two, balance&mdashmany of my beers that start as odd experiments come out way too strong in one aspect or another I don't really know any formula for this, though it's some combination of experience and luck.

Brewer: Zack Kinney
Style: American IPA with habañero
Competition results: First place in the spice, herb, or vegetable beer category of Hudson Valley Homebrewers 22nd Annual Competition (2012)

All-grain recipe, 5.25-gallon batch size
Original gravity: 1.068
Final gravity: 1.010
Bitterness: 82.3 IBU
Alcohol by volume: 7.7 percent

11 pounds Briess two-row malt
1 pound Briess White Wheat
1 pound Munich malt
1 pound Vienna malt
11 ounces Gambrinus Honey Malt
5 ounces Crystal 20L
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA)&mdashfirst wort, 60-plus minutes
1 ounce Centennial hop pellets (8.7 percent AA), 60 minutes
.5 ounces Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 15 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Warrior hop pellets (17.2 percent AA), 5 minutes
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets (13.4 percent AA), flameout
1 ounce Citra Hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 ounce Cascade hop pellets&mdashdry-hop, seven days
1 habañero chili pepper (Roast pepper for approximately 3 minutes over an open flame, just enough to get a bit of char on the outer skin. Then cut in half and soak in 46 ounces of vodka for 48 hours to sterilize. Add entire chili to secondary for seven days and reserve the vodka to blend back into the finished beer.)
3 vials of WLP001 California Ale

Mash for 60 minutes at 151 degrees F and mash out for 10 minutes at 168 F. Boil for 60 minutes. When yeasting, use a rocked carboy for about 5 minutes to oxygenate. Add 3 vials of yeast (no starter).

Fermentation: Primary fermentation for three weeks at 68 F. Cold-crash for two days. Rack to secondary and dry-hop/dry-habañero with 1 ounce Citra, 1 ounce Cascade, and 1 habañero chili pepper (pith, seeds, and all) for seven days. Cold-crash again for two days rack to keg and force-carbonate.

Water profile: NYC tap water and added 2 teaspoons gypsum (calcium sulfate) to mash.

Brewer's notes: I've brewed this recipe a few times (another version of this recipe placed first in the same category at the 6th Annual New England Regional Homebrew Competition) and am still tweaking certain elements of the base IPA, but the overall concept seems to be working: a solid malt backbone plus firm bitterness plus fresh American citrus/tropical hops plus habañero chili pepper flavor/heat. Dry hopping with the habañero didn't quite give me enough flavor or heat, which is why I added a measured amount of the infused vodka as well. However, it's important to taste the beer after secondary and while adding the vodka to make sure you don't overdo the heat. This beer goes great with BBQ or Mexican food.

Judges' notes: "Great American IPA with a good hops-to-pepper balance very good beer great heat on pepper can only drink a snifter at a time!!" "This is an awesome beer! Solid IPA backbone with the American hops, and the added unique citrus quality is beautiful. The balanced chili addition is exceptional. Please send me some!"



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