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The 20 Silliest Kitchen Tools Ever Invented

The 20 Silliest Kitchen Tools Ever Invented

You definitely do not need these tools in your kitchen

A sharp knife, a cutting board, a good set of pans — there are some things you absolutely should have in your kitchen even if you aren’t an avid cook. However, if you search even quickly around the internet or browse the shelves of your local kitchen store, you are bound to behold countless useless kitchen tools that you do not need at all.

For The 20 Silliest Kitchen Tools Ever Invented Slideshow, click here.

From strawberry hullers to kiwi peelers and from automatic sauce stirrers to vertical egg cookers, we have rounded up some of the silliest kitchen tools ever invented.

Some are more useless than others — some are single-purpose tools that will probably collect dust at the bottom of a drawer, while some might only be useful as gag gift to friends or relatives that don’t cook at all. Mostly though, if you are going to be buying something for your kitchen and you are spending your hard-earned cash, you may as well buy something that’s actually useful, right? Look through this list of silly kitchen gadgets and decide for yourself if these are the worst around


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.


The Best Kitchen Tongs

There's a reason restaurant cooks come to think of tongs as a second set of hands. Just like your hands, tongs should feel sure, strong, and deft—but without the mind-numbing pain of severely burned fingertips that comes with grabbing hot pans. Tongs should be able to grip, lift, flip, jostle, and move most foods, excluding very delicate ones, like fish. They can even be useful for picking up pieces of hot equipment and cookware. With a good pair of tongs, many common cooking tasks—from precision ones, like flipping shrimp, to herculean jobs like yanking a roast out of the oven—become a breeze.

Tongs are an uncomplicated tool that hasn't changed much over the years. The most common design features two stainless steel arms that are connected by a rivet hinge at one end and widen into scalloped grabbers at the other a metal spring controls the opening and closing action. A locking mechanism and maybe some silicone or rubber here and there are about as many bells and whistles as you're likely to get. Yet despite this nearly universal design, tongs can vary wildly in feel: Some are too stiff or wobbly, while others have wonky locks or can pinch the skin during use. We evaluated 32 sets of locking tongs to find comfortable, well-built, and easy-to-use models—both in basic stainless steel (good for most jobs) and with silicone grabbers (for use in nonstick pans and other damage-prone cookware)—that excel at a wide range of kitchen tasks.