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Asparagus Salad with Gruyère and Herbs

Asparagus Salad with Gruyère and Herbs

Servings

Ingredients

  • Raw asparagus, shaved lengthwise with a peeler

  • Olive oil

  • Fresh lemon juice

  • Leaves of tender herbs (such as mint, basil, cilantro, and dill)

  • Gruyère, shaved

  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Toss asparagus with oil, lemon juice, and herbs in a medium bowl. Top with Gruyère; season with salt and pepper.

Recipe by Sue Li

,

Photos by Zach DeSart

Reviews Section

Reviews

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16 Asparagus Recipes That Positively Scream Spring

Asparagus performs at its best with little effort: It retains its bright-green hue, delicate flavor and crisp-tender crunch when cooked quickly. Raw or roasted, blanched or sautéed, it pops up in a number of dishes that involve minimal labor, allowing the stalks to shine. When it comes to spring asparagus — and, perhaps, cooking in general at this stage of the pandemic — less is more.

This frittata from David Tanis is less fussy than most, and particularly fresh, leaning on vegetables for substance. On top, a quick blend of olive oil and herbs form an instant pesto, and a dollop of burrata takes this weeknight dish from practical to fanciful.

Eric Kim smartly and subtly elevates this creamy asparagus pasta with the addition of umami in two forms: Dasima (also known as kombu) flavors the noodles and broth, while roasted seaweed imparts an extra dash of brininess. Enlivened with rice vinegar and enriched with sesame oil, this dish is full of flair — and as sophisticated as weeknight meals come.

Melissa Clark calls her tart recipe “simple yet stunning, effortlessly chic and company-ready.” She opts for convenience here, using store-bought puff pastry slathered with a tangy goat cheese mixture, then showcasing fresh asparagus on top. “If you can manage to trim all the asparagus to the same length, this tart will be especially neat and orderly looking,” she writes, though patterns would be equally welcome.

As flavorful as it is easy, this recipe from Ali Slagle is bright, fresh and impossibly fast. Gather your ingredients — you’ll need a bunch of asparagus, some boneless chicken thighs and a lime, plus a modest list of pantry staples — and sauté them in minutes. Crisp and quickly cooked, the asparagus stays satisfyingly snappy in this sweet stir-fry.

This brunch-friendly dish, popularized at David Chang’s Momofuku Noodle Bar and adapted by Mark Bittman, is reminiscent of hollandaise sauce in richness, but pulls its salty, fermented flavor from miso. The fresh asparagus needs little attention. Sautéed in butter and sprinkled with salt, it tastes like spring.

In this sheet-pan recipe, Susan Spungen complements roasted asparagus with leeks and peas, but explains that “you could experiment with your vegetable choices: Cut delicate vegetables in larger pieces and firmer vegetables in smaller pieces so they cook at similar rates.” Scallions, carrots or fennel would all be welcome.

Ali Slagle pares asparagus pasta down to the essentials with this popular five-star recipe: Lemon, olive oil, garlic, herbs, panko bread crumbs and Parmesan are all the orzo and asparagus need to shine. Depending on the weather or your mood, you can enjoy this dish warm as is, or at room temperature for an approach that feels more like pasta salad.

This recipe from Yotam Ottolenghi acknowledges that good asparagus doesn’t need much. After all, as he puts it, “cooking asparagus is one of the easiest kitchen tasks around.” He suggests roasting it with some olive oil, just until softened and browned, and focusing on the toppings: almonds toasted in butter, fried capers and fresh dill.

Covered with ample amounts of asparagus, arugula and fresh parsley, this recipe from Susan Spungen offsets a rich ricotta-and-mozzarella base with a garden of green garnishes. The results are as springy as they are stunning.

Melissa Clark’s five-star recipe is a favorite for good reason: “This simple pasta primavera uses a combination of the earliest vegetables available in spring — asparagus, peas and spring onions — making it a true celebration of the season,” she writes. Simply sauté the greens until crisp-tender, then toss them with pasta, crème fraîche, Parmesan and herbs, and the results are flawless.

This easy pasta recipe is suited to climates where it already feels like summer. It requires a quick sauté of sliced asparagus, sweet corn kernels and scallions, while turmeric provides earthy notes and sunny hues. Ricotta adds richness, tempered with tanginess. For springier notes, swap the corn for thinly sliced fennel, or skip it entirely and pile on any fresh herbs you have handy.

Rich, textural and totally vegan, this salad from David Tanis carefully stacks flavor: Blanched green beans and snap peas, boiled farro, acidic lemon vinaigrette, raw asparagus, rich avocado and fresh basil combine into a salad that satiates any appetite. It’s a dish you just might crave year-round.

This hearty vegetable salad from Pati Jinich introduces asparagus to the heat of the grill and is ideal for any warm-weather cookout. She chars the vegetable along with spring onions and corn, then covers the mixture in salsa preparada, “an easy-to-eat sauce where umami, citrus and heat converge.” The recipe steers past delicate spring flavors, embracing a bold, punchy combination of salt, chile and lime for a salad that can stand alone or stand up to any number of grilled meats.

This five-star quiche from Martha Rose Shulman involves coaxing as much flavor as possible from fresh asparagus by roasting it. It’s a step that intensifies the vegetable’s flavor, so it stands up to the rich Gruyère and Parmesan here.

Carbonara gets accessorized for spring in this nontraditional pasta number. Asparagus, peas and basil enhance a traditionally rich emulsion of pasta, Parmesan and pork an optional sprinkle of lemon zest or a squeeze of lemon juice lifts it even higher.

This salad from Melissa Clark involves topping very verdant steamed asparagus with a quick dressing of lemon, shallots, herbs, nuts and Manchego — but its ingredients are also endlessly adaptable. Any allium, hard cheese, vinegar will work wonderfully. That’s the thing about spring asparagus: It’s not fussy, and needs little more than some olive oil, salt and pepper to delight.


1. Asparagus Frittata With Burrata and Herb Pesto

This frittata from David Tanis is less fussy than most, and particularly fresh, leaning on vegetables for substance. On top, a quick blend of olive oil and herbs form an instant pesto, and a dollop of burrata takes this weeknight dish from practical to fanciful.

Recipe: Asparagus Frittata With Burrata and Herb Pesto


Related Video

I made this recipe in an attempt to replicate an amazing meal I had at a restaurant in Boulder, CO. It was delicious roasted chicken on top of savory bread pudding. This recipe was PERFECT!! I substituted mushrooms in place the asparagus, choosing to have the asparagus as a side instead. I added a little extra milk before putting it in the oven. Served the bread pudding underneath the chicken, it was AMAZING!!

Made this for a family dinner for 10 today, and Iɽ say it was solid, but not amazing. I couldn't find fresh marjoram, so used dried, and cut back on the cheese by about 2 cups and added 1 egg and another cup of milk, because, as others suggested, it didn't soak all of the bread without it. Perhaps that was the problem, but it was definitely a pretty dish ans fun to make.

I guess my husband and I are in the minority we didn't care for this. It is too heavy for our taste. The bread and cheese overwhelms the asparagus.

I adapted this to use up some ingredients from making lasagna the day before. I used 1 cup of milk, 3 eggs, around 2 cups of grated mozzarella, 1/2 cup of grated parmesan, 1/2 a loaf of day-old french bread, cherry tomatoes cut in half, cooked broccoli, and seasoned it with oregano, basil, marjoram and thyme. I cooked it in a casserole dish, and forgot to let it stand for 20 minutes - it came out delicious! This is a great way to use up leftover ingredients and is pretty adaptable as you can see.

This is a fast and easy side dish that went well with roasted chicken. It was a great way to use up odds and ends in the refrigerator. I added prosciutto and some sharp cheddar that I had left over from the holidays. In response to the other reviews, I increased the amount of liquid and used 9 eggs and 3 cups of milk. Next time I will cut the bread pieces a little smaller, perhaps 1" instead of 1 1/2".

I made this recipe for a French theme cooking party and everyone loved it. I went ahead and used the 5 cups of cheese and it was absolutely delish!

Used stale ciabatta and mixture of asiago, provolone, parmesan and american cheese. Guests really liked it!

I have made this dish a number of times now and it is perfect for both brunch and dinner. The last time I made it I added sliced mushrooms to the pudding also. It adds a nice flavor and texture. I have also experimented with using more egg, slightly less cheese. It all works.

Absolutely delicious. Easy to make. The flavors melded so well. My husband couldn't restrain himself from eating mulitple servings and taking the small amount of leftovers to work for lunch. This is the one recipe worth forgetting about fat and cholesterol for one meal. You have to indulge once in a while!

This was very tasty. The husband loved it! I followed the recipe, only using all Greuyere instead of Swiss. and probably a little less than called for, it seemed like a LOT of cheese! I served this with Thomas Keller's Roasted Chicken (yum!) and a simple mache salad. This would make a great brunch dish as well.

Delicious recipe that also passed the "guy" test, and I think lends itself well to experimentation with other roasted veggies, cheeses and flavorings. I would add more egg mixture next time as I really couldn't get all the bread to "submerge.".

This was a really good side dish. Turned out a little dry for me, will just adjust size of bread cubes smaller for more even soaking.

did doctor it a bit, added more eggs, also prosciutto and lots of chives. Only used gruyere,but over all great side dish, Dissapeared in minutes again. Great for a 2nd epicurious recipe. Seems like I'm on a roll. thanks

This is a delicious recipe for a cold winter night as a main course or great as a starter. I absolutely love it.

There is a much better recipe for this same dish in Fine Cooking, Issue 26, named Asparagus Bread Pudding. It is absolutely delicious. You do not cook the aspagus first, there are two french cheeses, and fresh leeks.

I have always loved the texture of bread pudding. And I have always loved quiche. This recipe blends the two together into one of my new favorite first course dishes!

This was a different and delicious side dish for turkey and other traditonal side items at Thanksgiving. but this would be good all year round. The 3 cheeses seemed redundant, so just went with Gruyere, and only 2 1/2-3 cups of that (and it was still pretty cheesy !) It was well-received by my French hosts and the other guests.

I served this for a brunch to a French chef and a group of French people. They all had seconds and my American friends all wanted the recipe. I made the recipe as it is except I assemled it the night before and brought it to room temp in the morning before baking, which made the morning very manageable. I can't wait for an excuse to make it again and again. We will have it for Breakfast Christmas morning for certain! (PS. The leftovers were terrific.

I have made similar type overnight souffles which were much better. The dish just lacked taste and was bland.


Credit…Andrew Purcell for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Carrie Purcell.

In this sheet-pan recipe, Susan Spungen enhances roasted asparagus with leeks and peas, however explains that “you would experiment together with your vegetable selections: Cut delicate greens in bigger items and firmer greens in smaller items so that they cook dinner at comparable charges.” Scallions, carrots or fennel would all be welcome.

Recipe: Sheet-Pan Gnocchi With Asparagus, Leeks and Peas


Related Video

The only change I made to this recipe was to use dried herbes de provence instead of salad herbs/fines herbes. The omelet was very greasy, I would use much less butter and cook it at a lower heat. The flavors were good, but I wish there were something more. A side salad is necessary.

Very good. I used fresh parsley, chervil, and chives in about equal amounts, and eliminated the dried herbs. It had just a little too much cheese for my taste, but my guests loved it. Easy, simple, a nice light dinner for spring.

Fine - nothing amazing. I did have it with asparagus and roasted potatoes (which was a very nice matching). However, it was all a little dull.

This was great, except that I used the wrong spice-I didn't know what fine herbes was, so I used herbes de provence, and it was really strong. I added broccoli and it was a great combo. The parsley in the eggs is a nice touch.

This was a WONDERFUL recipe. It would be great with asparagus on the side. I am making it again this evening!

It´s a delicious recipe, my husbande loved it. I added some extra cheese, and I agree with the other reviews: I won´t do that again, I also thought I´ll cut the salt next time. It´s a very easy and delicious omelet

Had some leftover gruyere from a quiche, and made this quick & easy omelet. Now I'll always make sure to have gruyere on hand for this easy last minute dish. Agree with the previous review and warn not to exceed the amount of cheese - perfect as is.

Tried this for breakfast this morning, and I loved it. It was easy to make, and looked and tasted delicious. Next time I make it, I'm going to cut the salt to 1/8 tsp. and use less butter in the skillet. Added extra cheese to my omelet (I love cheese) and won't do that next time - even for a cheese lover, the extra was too much. Great recipe, I'll be making it again.

fabulous, rich but delicious. Everybody loved this recipe. Served it with the roasted potatoes, asparagus, salad and cheesebread. a filling dinner.

I made this recipe tonight for supper, french bread, mushroom and green salad and it was excellent. The gruyere cheese was perfect for this dish. I will not use any other kind of cheese again. Also used thyme and dill as the herbs. Fast and easy meal.


How to cook asparagus in the oven

A classic and healthy roasted asparagus never disappoints. Plus, it’s one of those “set it and forget it” kind of recipes that allows you ample time to focus on other kitchen tasks (and non-kitchen tasks, like the dog barking and phone ringing).

1. Quick and Easy Roasted Asparagus

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425ºF. Snap off dry ends of asparagus.
  2. Spread asparagus in a single layer on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat.
  3. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  4. Roast until asparagus ends are crispy, 15-20 minutes, tossing halfway through.

If you’re looking to showcase asparagus as more than just a side but are still in the mood to use your oven, we suggest a tart or omelette. In a rare feat of versatility, these recipes work for breakfast, brunch, lunch, and dinner.

2. Asparagus and Goat Cheese Tart

Tart, galette, savory pie… call it what you may, this cheesy asparagus concoction is sure to please.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Sheet Puff Pastry
  • 1 Pound Asparagus, trimmed
  • 3/4 Cup Gruyère Cheese
  • 1/2 Cup Goat Cheese
  • 3 Eggs (optional)
  • 2 Teaspoons Minced Garlic
  • 1 Lemon, zested

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Put a pot of water to boil for asparagus.
  2. Roll thawed puff pastry onto lined baking sheet, using a rolling pin to shape it into a rectangle.
  3. Use a knife to score a 1/2-inch border, but be sure to not cut all the way through. Prick the inside of the rectangle with a fork.
  4. Bake puff pastry 8-10 minutes.
  5. While pastry bakes, soften asparagus by placing them in boiling water for 1-2 minutes.
  6. Remove puff pastry from oven and add cheese. Lay asparagus on cheese and add garlic.
  7. If using eggs, carefully crack them over top, making sure not to break yolks.
  8. Place back in oven and bake another 20 minutes.
  9. Sprinkle over lemon zest before serving.

3. Herby Asparagus Frittata

Alright, alright… this frittata/omelette is technically prepared on the stove and in the oven, but we snuck it in the oven category ’cause that’s where most of the magic happens.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Thinly Sliced Asparagus
  • 6 Eggs
  • 1/2 Cup Packed Basil Leaves
  • 1/2 Cup Packed Parsley Leaves
  • 1/2 Cup Crumbled Goat Cheese
  • Salt and Black Pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons Butter (or 1 1/2 Tablespoons Olive Oil)

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut asparagus into thirds.
  2. Whisk eggs in a medium bowl until frothy. Mix in herbs, goat cheese, salt, and pepper.
  3. Heat butter or oil in ovenproof nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add asparagus and cook until beginning to soften, 2-4 minutes. Add egg mixture and stir to combine.
  4. Cook until egg mixture is set around edges but still wet in the center, about 5 minutes. Transfer to oven and cook until frittata is set in the center, 12-15 minutes.

And one more roasted asparagus recipe… because we just couldn’t resist.

4. Honey Mustard Salmon with Roasted Asparagus and Israeli Couscous Pilaf

Of all the reasons why this dish makes us smile, these are the top three:

  1. Tender salmon is chock-full of healthy fats.
  2. Honey and mustard are a sweet and tangy match made in heaven.
  3. The asparagus reaches tender, golden perfection in exactly the amount of time it takes for the salmon to cook through on the same baking sheet.

16 Asparagus Recipes That Positively Scream Spring

Asparagus performs at its best with little effort: It retains its bright-green hue, delicate flavor and crisp-tender crunch when cooked quickly. Raw or roasted, blanched or sautéed, it pops up in a number of dishes that involve minimal labor, allowing the stalks to shine. When it comes to spring asparagus — and, perhaps, cooking in general at this stage of the pandemic — less is more.

This frittata from David Tanis is less fussy than most, and particularly fresh, leaning on vegetables for substance. On top, a quick blend of olive oil and herbs form an instant pesto, and a dollop of burrata takes this weeknight dish from practical to fanciful.

Eric Kim smartly and subtly elevates this creamy asparagus pasta with the addition of umami in two forms: Dasima (also known as kombu) flavors the noodles and broth, while roasted seaweed imparts an extra dash of brininess. Enlivened with rice vinegar and enriched with sesame oil, this dish is full of flair — and as sophisticated as weeknight meals come.

Melissa Clark calls her tart recipe “simple yet stunning, effortlessly chic and company-ready.” She opts for convenience here, using store-bought puff pastry slathered with a tangy goat cheese mixture, then showcasing fresh asparagus on top. “If you can manage to trim all the asparagus to the same length, this tart will be especially neat and orderly looking,” she writes, though patterns would be equally welcome.

As flavorful as it is easy, this recipe from Ali Slagle is bright, fresh and impossibly fast. Gather your ingredients — you’ll need a bunch of asparagus, some boneless chicken thighs and a lime, plus a modest list of pantry staples — and sauté them in minutes. Crisp and quickly cooked, the asparagus stays satisfyingly snappy in this sweet stir-fry.

Recipe: Asparagus With Miso Butter

In this sheet-pan recipe, Susan Spungen complements roasted asparagus with leeks and peas, but explains that “you could experiment with your vegetable choices: Cut delicate vegetables in larger pieces and firmer vegetables in smaller pieces so they cook at similar rates.” Scallions, carrots or fennel would all be welcome.

Ali Slagle pares asparagus pasta down to the essentials with this popular five-star recipe: Lemon, olive oil, garlic, herbs, panko bread crumbs and Parmesan are all the orzo and asparagus need to shine. Depending on the weather or your mood, you can enjoy this dish warm as is, or at room temperature for an approach that feels more like pasta salad.

This recipe from Yotam Ottolenghi acknowledges that good asparagus doesn’t need much. After all, as he puts it, “cooking asparagus is one of the easiest kitchen tasks around.” He suggests roasting it with some olive oil, just until softened and browned, and focusing on the toppings: almonds toasted in butter, fried capers and fresh dill.

Covered with ample amounts of asparagus, arugula and fresh parsley, this recipe from Susan Spungen offsets a rich ricotta-and-mozzarella base with a garden of green garnishes. The results are as springy as they are stunning.

Melissa Clark’s five-star recipe is a favorite for good reason: “This simple pasta primavera uses a combination of the earliest vegetables available in spring — asparagus, peas and spring onions — making it a true celebration of the season,” she writes. Simply sauté the greens until crisp-tender, then toss them with pasta, crème fraîche, Parmesan and herbs, and the results are flawless.

This easy pasta recipe is suited to climates where it already feels like summer. It requires a quick sauté of sliced asparagus, sweet corn kernels and scallions, while turmeric provides earthy notes and sunny hues. Ricotta adds richness, tempered with tanginess. For springier notes, swap the corn for thinly sliced fennel, or skip it entirely and pile on any fresh herbs you have handy.

Rich, textural and totally vegan, this salad from David Tanis carefully stacks flavor: Blanched green beans and snap peas, boiled farro, acidic lemon vinaigrette, raw asparagus, rich avocado and fresh basil combine into a salad that satiates any appetite. It’s a dish you just might crave year-round.

This hearty vegetable salad from Pati Jinich introduces asparagus to the heat of the grill and is ideal for any warm-weather cookout. She chars the vegetable along with spring onions and corn, then covers the mixture in salsa preparada, “an easy-to-eat sauce where umami, citrus and heat converge.” The recipe steers past delicate spring flavors, embracing a bold, punchy combination of salt, chile and lime for a salad that can stand alone or stand up to any number of grilled meats.

This five-star quiche from Martha Rose Shulman involves coaxing as much flavor as possible from fresh asparagus by roasting it. It’s a step that intensifies the vegetable’s flavor, so it stands up to the rich Gruyère and Parmesan here.

Carbonara gets accessorized for spring in this nontraditional pasta number. Asparagus, peas and basil enhance a traditionally rich emulsion of pasta, Parmesan and pork an optional sprinkle of lemon zest or a squeeze of lemon juice lifts it even higher.

This salad from Melissa Clark involves topping very verdant steamed asparagus with a quick dressing of lemon, shallots, herbs, nuts and Manchego — but its ingredients are also endlessly adaptable. Any allium, hard cheese, vinegar will work wonderfully. That’s the thing about spring asparagus: It’s not fussy, and needs little more than some olive oil, salt and pepper to delight.


Rye Spaetzle with Asparagus and Gruyère

Recipe adapted from Eduard Frauneder, Freud, New York, NY

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes, plus cooling and resting time

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes, plus cooling and resting time

Ingredients

For the Spaetzle:

1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste

1 cup, plus 2 tablespoons, whole milk

2 tablespoons crème fraîche

For the Rye Crumble:

4 slices (2 ounces) rye bread

1 teaspoon rosemary, finely chopped

For the Dandelion Green Salad:

1 cup (2 ounces) dandelion greens, roughly torn

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

For Assembly:

2 tablespoons butter, unsalted

½ bunch (8 ounces) pencil asparagus, trimmed and cut into 3-inch pieces

1 cup grated Gruyère cheese

2 tablespoons minced chives

2 tablespoons roughly chopped parsley

Kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper and grated nutmeg, to taste

Directions

1. Make the spaetzle: In a large bowl, whisk together the flours and salt. Whisk in the eggs until incorporated, then slowly pour in the milk, whisking constantly, until a smooth batter comes together. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, make the rye crumble: Preheat the oven to 375°. Spread out the rye bread on a baking sheet and bake, flipping once, until dry, 5 minutes per side. Let cool completely, then transfer to a food processor with the remaining rye crumble ingredients. Pulse into coarse bread crumbs and set aside.

3. Make the dandelion salad: In a medium bowl, toss the dandelion greens with the olive oil and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper, then set aside.

4. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season with salt. Using a spaetzle maker, press the batter through the holes into the water. Cook until the spaetzle float and are tender, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain, reserving 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Toss the hot spaetzle with the crème fraîche to coat.

5. Assemble the dish: In a 12-inch skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the asparagus and cook until tender and golden, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the reserved spaetzle and cooking liquid, along with the grated cheese and peas. Cook, tossing constantly, until a thick sauce coats the spaetzle, 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the chives, parsley and lemon zest. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Divide between plates and top each with dressed dandelion greens and rye crumble, then serve.

*This article was originally published on 04/10/2016 by Tasting Table editors. The restaurant, chef and/or recipe are in no way affiliated with or endorsing the featured sponsor.


Asparagus and gruyère tart

This recipe uses four cheeses and seasonal asparagus to create a creamy home-baked tart. Jon Rotheram serves it up with a fresh watercress and roasted tomato salad.

250g rough puff pastry (or bought puff pastry) A little flour, to sprinkle the tray 1 egg, beaten 170g Gruyère, sliced 100g ricotta, 85g mascarpone 2 tbsp Parmesan, grated 2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, chopped 2 tbsp tarragon, chopped 1 bunch of asparagus, trimmed Salt and black pepper to season

12 plum tomatoes, cut in half lengthways, seeds removed 100g watercress, rinsed 2 tbsp olive oil 1 ½ tbsp balsamic vinegar 1 bunch of basil 2 large garlic cloves, minced Salt and pepper to season

Start by making the tomato salad. Place the tomatoes, cut in half lengthways, in a roasting tray and season with salt and pepper.

in a bowl, mix the garlic, olive oil and vinegar and dip the basil leaves in. Place the basil mixture on top of the tomatoes and put the tray in the oven. Roast the tomatoes on a low heat for 50 to 60 minutes or until the edges start to blacken. Leave to cool when ready.

To serve, place the roast tomatoes in a serving dish, add the watercress on the side and drizzle with the juices from the tray. You can add a drizzle of olive oil and vinegar too, if the roasting juices aren't enough.

For the tart, pre-heat the oven to 180C. Roll the pastry out enough to fit in your tray and to the thickness of a £1 coin. Trim the edges.

Sprinkle your baking tray with a bit of flour and lay the pastry on it. Score the border and prick the base with a fork. Brush the edges of the tart with the beaten egg and bake for 15 minutes.

In a bowl, mix the ricotta, the mascarpone, the herbs and half of the Parmesan, and season with salt and black pepper

When ready, remove the tray from the oven, squash down the centre of the tart if it has risen too high, and spread the cheese mixture over it. Scatter the Gruyère on top and put the asparagus along the length of the tart, alternating the direction of the tips.

Brush with a little olive oil, sprinkle over the remaining Parmesan and bake for about 20 minutes more