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How to Make Better-Tasting Coffee Slideshow

How to Make Better-Tasting Coffee Slideshow


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8 ways to help improve your morning cup

Maryse Chevriere

It's important that the size of the coffee grind corresponds to the brewing method you're planning on using. Coffee made with a French press, for example, needs to have a coarser grind, whereas something like espresso or Turkish-style coffee requires a very fine grind. And if you're serious about making better coffee at home, experts like Moore will tell you that it's worthwhile to invest in a good home grinder and grind as you go. (The burr-style grinder is a favorite among coffee geeks and will run you about $100-200).

It's a Grind

Maryse Chevriere

It's important that the size of the coffee grind corresponds to the brewing method you're planning on using. (The burr-style grinder is a favorite among coffee geeks and will run you about $100-200).

Better Water Makes Better Coffee

That, "You get out of something what you put into it," philosophy very much applies to making a good cup of coffee. Aside from the quality of the coffee beans themselves, using good quality, filtered water is another crucial detail. And don't forget that the temperature of the water you're brewing with is important, too. The general consensus seems to be that you want the water between 195 and 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Ratio Rationale

Maryse Chevriere

In order to achieve optimal extraction, the ratio of water to coffee grinds needs to be correct, as does the brewing time — under extract and you'll end up with a coffee that is thinned out and watery; over extract and the coffee will be intense and bitter. It's generally recommended to use two tablespoons of coffee for every six ounces of water and to brew for about four minutes — or to at least keep the brew time consistent. (Some experts even advocate measuring out your ingredients on a scale!)

Get It While It's Hot!

Maryse Chevriere

Drink your coffee right after it has been freshly brewed. Sure, it may seem obvious and logical, but it's an important piece of advice to keep in mind especially when you're measuring out how much coffee to make. Because the flavor of coffee starts to deteriorate soon after it has been brewed and becomes more bitter the longer it sits on a warmer, most advise only making as much as you plan on drinking immediately.

How Much to Buy

Maryse Chevriere

Just as it is important to pay attention to the amount of coffee you brew at one time, it is also key that you not buy more coffee beans than you need. Moore advises that it is best to only buy as much coffee as you think you're going to drink within a week or so. This will help ensure that the coffee you have on hand is always fresh, which is essential to making a better-tasting cup.

Pay Attention to the Roast Date

Especially among today's better-quality specialty brands, it is becoming increasingly more common to find detailed information about the coffee printed right on the bag. Case in point: The "roasted on" date, which in many ways acts as a "best by" date. The closer a coffee is to its roast date when you consume it, the more intense and aggressive the flavors will be.

Tips for Storing

As coffee is quite the temperamental product, there are not many environments that coffee beans or grinds find "friendly," so to speak. "Coffee hates air, light, heat, and moisture," explains Moore. After you first open a bag of coffee, he recommends storing the rest in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. And don't make the mistake of storing coffee in your refrigerator or freezer, as it risks absorbing some of the flavors of surrounding ingredients.

Give Your Coffee Machine a Good Scrub (Just Not with Soap)

When you've gone to the effort to make a really good cup of coffee, the last thing you want is to end up with a cup that doesn't reflect that freshness because it's been a while since you last cleaned your machine. You don't want to taste the remnants from last month's batch in this morning's cup, after all. (Click here for some advice on how to clean your machine.)


7 tips that will change the way you brew coffee at home

Even a drip coffee machine can brew a cup with an artisanal flavor.

I (really) love coffee, so I'm always testing new ways to make the best home-brewed cup of coffee.

There are a few techniques that can immediately improve the quality of your coffee, no matter how fancy (or basic) your coffee machine is.

Here are five tips for making your drip coffee taste a whole lot better.

1. Buy fresh, whole bean coffee

A cup of coffee is only as good as the beans you start with.

If you're buying bags of preground coffee, you're doing it wrong. Instead, start with fresh, whole beans.

There's a reason most coffee companies don't provide the date for when the coffee was roasted the stuff you find on the shelf in the grocery store has probably been there for months. Coffee reaches its peak flavor just days after it has been roasted and should be consumed within a month of its roast date.

To find fresh coffee, check local coffee shops. Some roast on the spot or source from local roasters who roast in smaller batches, which typically means fresher coffee.

2. Properly store beans

Store your coffee correctly and you'll keep its flavor fresh for as long as possible.

To keep the coffee you buy fresh for longer, make sure you're storing it properly. While a vacuum sealed container with a one-way valve is recommended by many, a standard Mason jar will suffice for most people.

If you've got multiple sized mason jars, it's not a bad idea to move the coffee to the most appropriately sized jar as you brew through it. A wide mouthed quart-sized jar (946.35 milliliters) is perfect for storing 12 ounces (340 grams) of coffee. As you work your way through the bag, you can downsize the jar to a pint-sized (473.18 milliliters) jar, or even use 4 ounce (118.29 milliliters) jelly jars to store pre-weighed servings.

3. How and when you grind matters

Grind your coffee immediately before brewing for maximum flavor.

Experts say coffee begins to lose its flavor within 30 minutes of being ground. This being the case, it's best to grind on the spot, just before brewing a pot.

Grind size and consistency matter quite a bit, as well. Grind too coarse and you will have a weak pot of coffee. Grind too fine and you will over-extract the coffee and it will taste bitter. Most drip coffee makers call for a medium to medium-fine grind.

Unless you want to spend upward of $100 (roughly £80 and AU$130) on a quality automatic burr grinder, a manual hand mill is the most affordable way to achieve a nice, consistent grind, though they do require a small amount of manual labor.

Blade grinders also work, but will produce inconsistent particle size, which can lead to over-extraction.


How to Make Keurig Coffee Taste Good

The Keurig is an interesting device I like to think of it as the millennial cousin of the traditional coffee maker. But those who take their coffee seriously may wonder how to make Keurig coffee taste good, doubting that this kind of coffee machine can brew high-quality coffee. The Keurig waltzed into the world in 1992, boasting a tech-savvy persona that makes brewing a cup of coffee quick and easy. The device makes coffee at home with little to no effort, and can even make tea, hot chocolate, and cider. And while the Keurig can brag about its versatility, not everyone is impressed with Keurig coffee.

Most coffee snobs (you know who you are) will attribute the Keurig’s mediocrity to its watered down coffee. Good news: You have the power to change that. The solution lies within a reusable K-Cup filter. Not only will you cut down on trash, but you’ll have the freedom to use your own freshly ground coffee rather than Keurig K-Cups while maintaining the convenience of a Keurig coffee maker. More importantly, you can add enough coffee to produce a bolder cup. Your brew, your rules.

The Keurig needs a little TLC––just like “old school” coffee makers. Make it a habit to regularly clean the Keurig, especially the K-Cup holder and water chamber. It wouldn’t hurt to wipe off the drip-tray, too. Use white vinegar to clean the inside of the Keurig simply run a few cycles to break down debris in the tubes and valves. If you hate the smell of vinegar, add a few drops of lemon juice. This type of routine maintenance will help your machine run smoother and be the best that it can be.

Warming up the Keurig will also help brew a good cup of coffee. A single round simply isn’t sufficient enough to get the water hot enough for the lightning fast cycle. Basically, the Keurig’s highlight is also its downfall. To remedy this issue, run one cycle of water without a K-Cup before you make the real thing. This will get your Keurig revved up and ready to make a solid, hot cup of coffee.

Although nothing can ever replace the beauty of a pour-over from your favorite barista at your local coffee joint, it’s hard to deny the convenience of the almighty Keurig. And with many offices adding Keurig machines to their kitchens, it certainly helps to keep these tricks in mind.


Cold Brew Coffee

Cold brew at home? Easy! All it takes is a little time and patience for a perfect cup of cold brew in the comfort of you home. In the fall you can turn it into a Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew!

Cold Brew vs Iced Coffee.

There is a difference! Iced coffee is essentially a cup of of hot coffee that's been cooled down and then poured over ice. This typically leads to a watered down cup of coffee. Not ideal. Cold brew, on the other hand, is brewed slowly using cold water. It takes much longer, but the results are a very smooth, less acidic cup of coffee.

Is this a concentrate?

Yes! This will yield about 4 cups of a cold brew concentrate. You'll want to dilute your coffee with some water or preferred milk or creamer. We like a stronger cup of coffee and recommend a 2:1 ratio of coffee to water. If you plan to add milk. Dilute the concentrate with a mix of water and milk!

How coarse should my coffee grounds be?

Coarse!! When is doubt, the coarser the better. Your coffee grounds should resemble a raw or coarse sugar. They will be rough and each ground is distinct and easy to see. They shouldn't be fine and powdery like a medium or fine ground like you would use for a drip coffee maker.

How long does the coffee take to steep?

Ideally you need to let your cold brew steep for about 16 to 18 hours. Any less and you'll still have an acidic coffee. After 16 hours you'll have a very smooth and rich tasting coffee. Much longer than 18 hours and your coffee will start to taste murky and muddy.

How long will my cold brew keep?

Once strained, your cold brew will keep in the fridge for about 7 to 10 days!


7 Tips for Making the Best Coffee Ever

If you&rsquore already a fan of the stuff, you likely don&rsquot need convincing that coffee is a good thing. Not only does it wake up your senses and brain to prepare for the day, but it&rsquos also been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, certain cancers and mental deterioration. But really, those who sip coffee do so chiefly because it tastes good &mdash and what if you could make that morning cup even better? Here are seven ways to improve your brew.

By Sara Dreibelbis for Food Network Kitchen

Start with Whole Beans

Don't Store Coffee in the Freezer (or Fridge)

Buy Beans in Small Batches

Heat More Than Just the Coffee

You know why they stack the coffee cups on top of the cappuccino machine at your favorite Italian restaurant? To keep them warm, which helps your coffee stay hot longer. To keep your mug toasty at home, fill it with hot water while you wait for the coffee to brew. If you take cream or milk, heat it in a mug in the microwave before you add your java.


The 3 Common Kitchen Items You Need to Make Cold Brew Coffee at Home

In the coffee drinking world, there are two camps: there are the cold-brew-all-year people and there are those who observe strict seasonal coffee preferences (hot coffee in the fall and winter months, cold brew in the spring and summer months). I’m not here to judge. I’m here to tell you that if you’ve been relying on your nearest coffee shop for your cold brew fix, there’s a better way. Rather than spend upwards of $5 for cold brew from your barista, you can make a chilled glass of smoothly flavored, caffeinated goodness in the comfort of your own home with three common kitchen tools.

Over the years of making it in my own kitchen, I’ve perfected the alchemy required for cold brew and my technique needs three things: a French press, a mesh strainer and a pitcher. The French press is for actually brewing your cold brew &mdash and if only want one tool, this is the one you need. The mesh strainer makes sure your cold brew, once you’ve brewed it and pressed it, has a smooth texture for easy and delicious sipping. The pitcher allows you to store large batches of cold brew in your refrigerator. It’s a three-step process that I lather, rinse, repeat until the seasons change.

Cold Brew Coffee

  1. Combine coffee grounds, dash of cinnamon (I add this for a hint of flavor, but it is definitely optional) and 1 liter of water in a french press and stir. Place the lid on the French press, but do not press. Leave sitting at room temperature for 12-24 hours.
  2. Remove the lid from the French press and stir the coffee-cinnamon-water mixture again. Replace the lid and press.
  3. Strain the liquid through a mesh strainer before collecting it in the pitcher to be refrigerated. The mesh strainer I use fits neatly in the opening of my pitcher, so I can simply strain the liquid as I pour it into my pitcher. Refrigerate and serve over ice.

If you still aren’t convinced to make your own, we love these ready-to-drink cold brew coffees for your morning cup. And if you’re feeling super fancy, you can give the trendy Dalgona coffee a try. We promise it’s actually a lot easier to make than it looks.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you&rsquoll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale and the retailer may receive certain auditable data for accounting purposes.


Irish Coffee: 5 Delicious Ways to Reconsider the Famed Cocktail

The best classic cocktails always seem to come with a fuzzy backstory, part word-of-mouth, part myth-making. The Irish Coffee, however, is based more on truth than fiction, likely because there may still be people alive to tell its tale.

Back in the 1940s, before large airports existed around the world, Pan American flying boats—passenger planes that could perform water landings—were regularly making journeys across the Atlantic. One of the stops the airline made was at Foynes, in Ireland, on the banks of the Shannon Estuary. A local chef by the name of Joe Sheridan would greet passengers with a cup of hot coffee to which he added a little Irish whiskey. It’s said a passenger once asked Sheridan if the coffee they were drinking was Brazilian. Sheridan answered no. It was Irish.

By 1945, the Irish Coffee was being served at the much larger Shannon airport across the estuary in County Clare. A restaurant bearing Sheridan’s name is still in operation. But it wasn’t until 1952 when travel writer Stanton Delaplane was traveling through the airport that the Irish Coffee, now topped with a float of cream, would make its own journey across the pond.

Delaplane enjoyed the hot cocktail so much that he brought the recipe back home with him to San Francisco, where he introduced it to George Freeberg and Jack Koeppler, the owners of The Buena Vista Cafe. The café on Hyde Street is considered the birthplace of the Irish Coffee in America, where it’s still served today.

Over the years, Sheridan’s creation, like so many of the best classic cocktails, has welcomed countless interpretations, turning what was essentially an airport welcome tipple into something, well, just as elevated. These are five riffs on the Irish Coffee that are worth the caffeine buzz.


3. Use xylitol.

I love Xylitol. It’s a natural sweetener that is derived from either birch trees or corn stalks, depending which brand you buy. It’s got 1/3 the calories of sugar and has a low glycemic index. You can use it 1-for-1 in substitution for regular sugar. This is the kind of Xylitol I use and it’s made from non-GMO corn stalks. The downside is that it’s more expensive than sugar and not as easy to find. This is why I don’t publish too many recipes with it. I used it recently to sweeten a cup of hot cocoa for Meghan and she loved it. If you are hooked on a very sweet cup of coffee, this might be your best bet. Please know that xylitol is toxic for dogs and use caution if you use this and have a furry friend at your house.


The 3 Common Kitchen Items You Need to Make Cold Brew Coffee at Home

In the coffee drinking world, there are two camps: there are the cold-brew-all-year people and there are those who observe strict seasonal coffee preferences (hot coffee in the fall and winter months, cold brew in the spring and summer months). I’m not here to judge. I’m here to tell you that if you’ve been relying on your nearest coffee shop for your cold brew fix, there’s a better way. Rather than spend upwards of $5 for cold brew from your barista, you can make a chilled glass of smoothly flavored, caffeinated goodness in the comfort of your own home with three common kitchen tools.

Over the years of making it in my own kitchen, I’ve perfected the alchemy required for cold brew and my technique needs three things: a French press, a mesh strainer and a pitcher. The French press is for actually brewing your cold brew &mdash and if only want one tool, this is the one you need. The mesh strainer makes sure your cold brew, once you’ve brewed it and pressed it, has a smooth texture for easy and delicious sipping. The pitcher allows you to store large batches of cold brew in your refrigerator. It’s a three-step process that I lather, rinse, repeat until the seasons change.

Cold Brew Coffee

  1. Combine coffee grounds, dash of cinnamon (I add this for a hint of flavor, but it is definitely optional) and 1 liter of water in a french press and stir. Place the lid on the French press, but do not press. Leave sitting at room temperature for 12-24 hours.
  2. Remove the lid from the French press and stir the coffee-cinnamon-water mixture again. Replace the lid and press.
  3. Strain the liquid through a mesh strainer before collecting it in the pitcher to be refrigerated. The mesh strainer I use fits neatly in the opening of my pitcher, so I can simply strain the liquid as I pour it into my pitcher. Refrigerate and serve over ice.

If you still aren’t convinced to make your own, we love these ready-to-drink cold brew coffees for your morning cup. And if you’re feeling super fancy, you can give the trendy Dalgona coffee a try. We promise it’s actually a lot easier to make than it looks.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you&rsquoll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale and the retailer may receive certain auditable data for accounting purposes.


Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.



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