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Golden Succotash

Golden Succotash


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Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups 1/2-inch cubes peeled red-skinned sweet potato (yam)
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, 1/2-inch dice
  • 1 cup frozen corn kernels
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon

Recipe Preparation

  • Melt butter in large skillet over medium heat. Stir in sweet potato, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and 1 tablespoon water. Cover and cook 4 to 5 minutes. Add bell pepper. Cover; cook until sweet potato is tender, 2 to 3 minutes longer. Add corn and tarragon. Sauté, uncovered, until corn is tender, 2 minutes. Season with salt, black pepper, and 1 tablespoon lemon juice, if desired.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 166.0 %Calories from Fat 47.7 Fat (g) 8.8 Saturated Fat (g) 5.3 Cholesterol (mg) 22.5 Carbohydrates (g) 20.3 Dietary Fiber (g) 3.3 Total Sugars (g) 4.9 Net Carbs (g) 17.0 Protein (g) 2.7 Sodium (mg) 23.6Reviews Section

Summer Succotash Gratin

Preheat the oven to 425° and position a rack in the center. In a large, deep skillet, melt the butter in 2 tablespoons of the oil. Add the onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the bell pepper, corn, green beans, fava beans and Aleppo, season with salt and black pepper and cook, stirring, until the beans are crisp-tender, 3 minutes. Add the stock and simmer until evaporated, about 3 minutes.

Transfer the vegetables to a large baking dish and let cool slightly. Stir in the basil, chives, cream and eggs.

In a small bowl, toss the panko with the shredded cheese and the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Season the topping with salt and pepper sprinkle over the succotash and bake for 10 minutes, until heated through.

Turn on the broiler and broil in the center of the oven for about 3 minutes, just until the top is golden. Let the gratin stand for 10 minutes, then serve.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup fresh or frozen lima beans
  • 4 (6-oz.) boneless, skinless grouper fillets
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 ½ cups fresh corn kernels (from 2 large ears)
  • 1 large shallot, thinly sliced
  • 1 ½ cups halved multicolored cherry tomatoes
  • ¼ cup torn fresh basil, plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil over high add lima beans. Reduce heat to maintain a gentle boil and cook until tender, about 15 minutes for fresh and 8 to 10 minutes for frozen. Drain.

While beans cook, season grouper with 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Melt 1 tablespoon butter with olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high. Cook grouper, turning over once, until golden brown, firm, and flaky, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate using a slotted spatula cover with aluminum foil to keep warm.

Add corn and shallot to drippings in skillet cover and cook over medium-high, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 4 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and lima beans cook uncovered, stirring often, until heated through, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in basil, lemon juice, remaining tablespoon butter, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Return grouper to skillet. Garnish with additional basil before serving.


Pomegranate And Charred Corn Succotash

(By Ben Iozzo, executive chef, The Vinoy Club, St. Petersburg, Florida)

Chef Ben Iozzo takes a somewhat radical approach to succotash by completely eliminating beans and tomatoes from his recipe. The resulting dish, which features charred corn and pomegranate seeds, is best served with “pan-seared black grouper on a bed of cabbage, braised with a sour gose ale [alongside] butternut squash grits with port-infused beet puree.”

Ingredients:

  • 3 ears of corn
  • 1 pomegranate
  • .5 red onion
  • 12 Shishito peppers (Iozzo says that “if you can’t find Shishitos, [you can] substitute with poblano peppers”)
  • 1 bunch chopped cilantro
  1. Husk corn and chargrill for a few minutes until ears darken. Once cooled off, cut corn off cob.
  2. Peel and remove seeds of one pomegranate.
  3. Finely dice half of a red onion.
  4. Julienne 12 Shishito peppers.
  5. Chop one bunch of cilantro.
  6. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl.
  7. Before serving, briefly sauté the succotash to warm it through.

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Seared Cod & Summer Succotash

Creamy and petite (not to mention gorgeous), fairy tale eggplant shines in bountiful vegetable medleys—like our succotash, an irresistible dish with Native American roots. The varied tastes and textures of this succotash are a perfect match for mild, flaky cod. To top it all off, we’re quickly “pickling” grapes with a bit of sugar and vinegar, an easy technique for enhancing the fruit’s sweet, tart flavor.

Title
  • 2 Cod Fillets
  • 6 oz Green Beans
  • 4 oz Red Grapes
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 2 Scallions
  • 2 oz Fairy Tale Eggplant
  • 1 ear Of Corn
  • 1 Plum Tomato
  • 3 Tbsps Rice Flour
  • 2 Tbsps White Wine Vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar

Wash and dry the fresh produce. Remove and discard any stems from the grapes thinly slice into rounds. Medium dice the eggplant. Peel and mince the garlic. Cut off and discard the root ends of the scallions thinly slice on an angle, separating the white bottoms and green tops. Remove and discard the husks and silks of the corn. Cut the corn kernels off the cob discard the cob. Snap off and discard the stem ends of the green beans cut into ½-inch pieces. Core and small dice the tomato.

In a medium bowl, combine the vinegar, sugar and a big pinch of salt stir until the sugar has dissolved. Add the grapes and stir to coat. Set aside to pickle, stirring occasionally, for at least 10 minutes.

While the grapes pickle, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the eggplant and cook, stirring occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until lightly browned and slightly softened season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a plate. Wipe out the pan.

While the grapes continue to pickle, in the same pan, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the garlic, white bottoms of the scallions, corn and green beans season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 to 6 minutes, or until softened and fragrant. Add the tomato and cooked eggplant season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until softened season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a plate. Rinse and wipe out the pan.

Place the flour on a plate. Pat the cod fillets dry with paper towels season with salt and pepper on both sides. Thoroughly coat the seasoned fillets in the flour (tapping off any excess). In the same pan, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the coated fillets and cook 3 to 5 minutes on the first side, or until golden brown. Flip and cook 2 to 3 minutes, or until cooked through. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate immediately season with salt and pepper.

Divide the succotash and cooked cod fillets between 2 dishes. Garnish with the green tops of the scallions. Top the fillets with the pickled grapes and as much of the pickling liquid as you’d like. Enjoy!

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Wash and dry the fresh produce. Remove and discard any stems from the grapes thinly slice into rounds. Medium dice the eggplant. Peel and mince the garlic. Cut off and discard the root ends of the scallions thinly slice on an angle, separating the white bottoms and green tops. Remove and discard the husks and silks of the corn. Cut the corn kernels off the cob discard the cob. Snap off and discard the stem ends of the green beans cut into ½-inch pieces. Core and small dice the tomato.

In a medium bowl, combine the vinegar, sugar and a big pinch of salt stir until the sugar has dissolved. Add the grapes and stir to coat. Set aside to pickle, stirring occasionally, for at least 10 minutes.

While the grapes pickle, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the eggplant and cook, stirring occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until lightly browned and slightly softened season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a plate. Wipe out the pan.

While the grapes continue to pickle, in the same pan, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the garlic, white bottoms of the scallions, corn and green beans season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 to 6 minutes, or until softened and fragrant. Add the tomato and cooked eggplant season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until softened season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a plate. Rinse and wipe out the pan.

Place the flour on a plate. Pat the cod fillets dry with paper towels season with salt and pepper on both sides. Thoroughly coat the seasoned fillets in the flour (tapping off any excess). In the same pan, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the coated fillets and cook 3 to 5 minutes on the first side, or until golden brown. Flip and cook 2 to 3 minutes, or until cooked through. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate immediately season with salt and pepper.

Divide the succotash and cooked cod fillets between 2 dishes. Garnish with the green tops of the scallions. Top the fillets with the pickled grapes and as much of the pickling liquid as you’d like. Enjoy!


Summer succotash with bacon and croutons

[Er, croutons not pictured.] Here’s the thing: If you told me you were serving succotash with or for dinner, I’d inwardly groan. People, I’ve had all sorts of succotash — a summery stew of corn and lima beans, often with tomatoes, yet still so bland that no added butter or cream saves it for me, and when adding butter and cream don’t save something for me, you know something is terribly wrong — and can’t think of one that I wanted to run home and make for myself. It might be because it’s usually in the off-season, when the above come frozen and no, it’s just not the same. It might also be because I once had a roommate that would open cans of succotash, not drain it, heat it in the microwave and eat it straight and guys, it’s been many, many years and still, my stomach turns. Don’t ever live with me. I’m a jerk.


But this is different. This was a midsummer dinner dream, the result of another bleachingly sunny, sauna of a day when I staggered around the market and realized if I put this stand’s corn and that stand’s shell beans and those purty tomatoes together, I might make a succotash that was worth writing home about. I wondered if you could pork it up. I wondered if I could pass it off as a main course. I came home with the haul of all hauls and discovered, as I often do, that Gourmet (moment of silence) had beaten me to it more than a decade ago. I love it when they do that.

I shucked and shucked*. Hey, did you know fresh limas are hard to shuck? I did not. Their pods were leathery and they kept me busy for a while, but it was completely worth it. Cranberry beans are not only the prettiest of the bean family, they just tumble out of their pods with almost no effort. A big knife took the corn right off the cob, I halved tomatoes, fried maple bacon, made garlic croutons, drizzled the whole lot with sherry vinegar and with one spoonful, made peace with succotash. Or succotash when it tastes like this, so busy with flavor — zingy, tangy and bold! crunchy and sweet! full of song! — that it’s a great big bowl of summer.



* I think I deserve an award for resisting a painful shucking all night long reference.

Summer Succotash with Bacon and Garlic Croutons
Adapted, barely, from Gourmet

I tossed this dish with garlic croutons (below). You could cut the pieces of bread thinner (into 6 1/3-inch slices), and spoon the succotash over it (Gourmet’s suggestion). Two other ideas: nixing the bread, and make this into a pasta or farro salad with some additional vinegar and oil for “dressing”.

1 pound fresh shell beans in pod or 1 cup frozen baby lima beans (I used 1/2 pound fresh cranberry beans, 1/2 pound fresh lima beans)
1/4 pound bacon (about 4 slices)
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small Vidalia onion or other sweet onion, chopped
1 large garlic clove, minced
3/4 pound cherry tomatoes (about 1 1/2 pints), halved
Fresh kernels from 4 ears corn
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar, plus more to taste
1/4 cup packed small fresh basil leaves (I used less)
1/4 cup packed small fresh arugula leaves (I used more)

Shell fresh beans if using. In a small saucepan of boiling salted water cook beans over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until just tender, about 5 minutes for fresh or frozen lima beans, 20 to 25 for fresh cranberry beans. In a sieve drain beans and rinse under cold running water to stop cooking. Set aside.

In a skillet cook bacon over moderate heat until crisp. Drain bacon on paper towels and crumble. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon bacon fat from skillet. Add oil to bacon fat in skillet and cook onion over moderate heat, stirring, until just softened. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Add tomatoes, corn, and vinegar and cook, stirring, until tomatoes just begin to lose their shape. Remove skillet from heat and gently stir in cooked beans and half of bacon. Cool succotash to room temperature and gently stir in basil and arugula, and salt, pepper and additional sherry vinegar to taste. Toss with croutons (below, if using) and sprinkle with remaining bacon before serving.

1 garlic clove, peeled and halved
1 round loaf crusty bread
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt

Cut three 1-inch-thick slices from middle of loaf and brush bread with oil. Lightly oil a well-seasoned ridged grill pan and heat over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking. Grill bread until golden brown on both sides. Alternately, you can run toasts under the broiler for a minute. Remove from heat and immediately rub bread both sides with cut side of garlic and sprinkle with salt. Cut into cubes and toss into succotash.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 3 cups)
  • 2 ounces green beans, sliced on the bias into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 cup homemade or low-sodium chicken stock, skimmed of fat
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen shelled edamame
  • 1 teaspoon roughly chopped fresh thyme
  • Pinch of coarse salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon roughly chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

In a steamer basket set over a pan of simmering water, steam squash until just tender enough to be easily pierced with a sharp knife, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a plate set aside. Add green beans to basket steam until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat set aside.

In a 10-inch saute pan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and lightly golden, about 3 minutes. Add chicken stock, and bring to a simmer. Add corn and edamame cook, stirring occasionally, until brightly colored and crisp-tender, about 3 minutes.

Add thyme with steamed squash and green beans cook until heated through, about 3 minutes, stirring to combine. Season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with parsley. Serve immediately.


Pan-Roasted Salmon with Summer Succotash

Recipe by Giada De Laurentiis

Giada is a chef, mother, author and restauranteur. She is known as the Emmy-award winning television personality of Food Network’s Everyday Italian, Giada at Home, Giada In Italy, as a judge on Food Network Star, NBC Today Show correspondent, for her eight New York Times best-selling cookbooks and her debut restaurant, GIADA, in Las Vegas. Though most days, you can find her in Los Angeles with her daughter, Jade and kitten, Bella, whipping up something delicious in the kitchen involving parmiggiano reggiano or her weakness, dark chocolate!

It doesn’t get more quintessentially summer than this roasted salmon with corn succotash. The flaky salmon is perfectly cooked, served over a bed of peppers, shallots, corn, kale and edamame, and finished with a bright and creamy sauce. I love using fresh corn, shaved right off the ear to make a seasonal succotash. Served with roasted salmon, it’s a light but satisfying meal that says summer is here! The trick to getting the salmon just right is to let it cook undisturbed until a nice crust forms on the bottom. If you try to flip it too soon, it will stick.

After your perfectly seasonal dinner, finish the evening with an equally summery nightcap! Some of my favorite summer cocktails are a classic Aperol spritz or my jalepeño-watermelon sipper. Cheers!


Golden Gate Gardener

November 23, 2007

Gardeners sometimes eat beans at the shell stage, which is after the beans have fully formed in the pods, but before they have hardened. Just about anything you can cook with dry beans, you can cook with shell beans--but faster. You won't find them in the market often, since they don't keep well, so they are mostly a gardeners' secret.

You could eat any common garden bean variety at this stage, but several are sold specifically for it. They often have these splashy red pods. This one is a bush bean called 'Taylor's Horticultural'. Sometimes you find a similar one called 'Tongue of Fire.' At the shell stage, the beans are white or white streaked with red. When they become dry beans, they are bown streaked with maroon, and are often called cranberry beans.

So, in any case, I planted these in July in San Francsisco and harvested them at the shell stage in the second half of October and early November. I grew about 10 cups of beans (out of the pods) in a bed about 6 by 3 or 4 feet. And then I experimented with cooking them. They were great as Boston baked beans, fine in a French soup with pistou, and made yummy succotash.

And here is the succotash I made, with some of the beans and an open pod. The recipes I used were from The Victory Garden Cookbook, Marian Morash, Alfred Knopf, 1982. I modified the succotash recipe to make it vegan so I could take it to a class potluck. The recipe, as modified: 2 cups of shell beans, 2 tablespoons of chopped onion, 1 cup chopped tomato (from a can), 2 cups corn kernels (from frozen), 2 tablespoons Smart Balance margarine, a bit of salt and pepper. Put beans and chopped onions in a saucepan and add a cup of water. Bring water to a boil, cover, and simmer 20 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and corn. Simmer for 10 minutes longer. Stir in margarine, salt and pepper to taste. (4-6 servings).

The original recipe suggested using a mixture of lima and shell beans, since the original native American dish was more likely to use limas, but limas don't do so well in cool SF, so I just cut to the chase and used all shell beans. Got me thinking about succotash, which I for some reason thought was a Native American dish from the Southeastern part of the continent. But when I looked it up, I found that it was a dish of the Nanaganset, of what is now Rhode Island, who spoke Algonquian. The word, in Algonquian, was m'sickquatash, and meant "corn not crushed or ground." So there you have it.

What was in the original succotash? Not bacon, which was in the recipe I used before I modified it, though maybe other meat. And I read that the tomatoes suggest a Dutch influence, since they were known to add tomatoes and other vegetables to succotash.


Seafood and Summer Succotash

Healthy, curated living from a dietitian nutritionist and recipe developer.

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Get your favorite white fish, like tilapia, cook it up with simple seasonings in just a few minutes and serve it with a summer succotash bursting with flavors and colors.

An easy way to eat more fish: fool-proof tilapia with summer succotash salad.

When was the last time you ate fish? We go through periods of being absolutely obsessed with eating fish using a specific cooking method…and then go off of it for a few weeks. Last time our obsession hinged on lightly breading fish and baking it. Today’s fish recipe is so ridiculously fast (less than 10 minutes) and easy I’m hoping you’ll get hooked (HA!).

I think so many people don’t eat fish because they’re overwhelmed by food safety. Either they’re not sure how to tell when it’s ‘done’ (I mean with chicken or beef you can cut it open and know easily with color), or they’re so concerned with making sure it IS ‘done’ the fish becomes over baked, dry and flavorless. To know if your tilapia is done cooking, you’re going for white and flaky. You could use a knife or a fork and cut into it and see the meat flake apart.

Today we are going to cook lightly floured tilapia in cast iron for three minutes on each side to yield a golden browned filet that’s lightly crisped and perfectly cooked. SO FAST! While today’s recipe pairs it with a summer succotash salad, you can easily pair it with steamed veggies, or stir fried veggies and rice, or put it on a sandwich. Quick pan cooking this fish is going to give you a cooking method you can use again and again.


Watch the video: Seared Scallops and Succotash (June 2022).