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The Best Restaurants in New York City

The Best Restaurants in New York City


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These 24 restaurants are the Big Apple’s best

Jean Georges is the flagship of renowned chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

Every year since 2011, we’ve set out to identify the 101 best restaurants in America, and one city has always found itself with more entries than any other. You guessed it: New York. This year, 24 restaurants from the five boroughs made the ranking, and they represent the best fine-dining The Big Apple has to offer.

The Best Restaurants in New York City (Slideshow)

If you’ve encountered one of our previous rankings, you probably know that our methodology for assembling our annual list is anything but arbitrary. This year, we started with a “shortlist” of about 700 restaurants from around the country (76 of which were in New York City), and we reached out to hundreds of restaurant experts of various stripes around the country and asked them to vote for their favorites. Here are the results.

The task of choosing our nation's best restaurants — as our panelists would surely tell you — becomes more difficult every year, because the number of excellent places to eat continues to grow. As our interest in, and appreciation of, good food continues to increase — as more great chefs train more younger good ones — fantastic food continues to spread across America. Exceptional culinary landscapes in big cities get better, while new and different dining scenes in every corner of the country are born, in turn attracting and inspiring more talented cooks. All this makes trying to rank the country’s best restaurants more and more challenging, but also more and more worthwhile and intriguing.

At the end of the day, however, it comes as no surprise that the highest concentration of America’s best restaurants would call New York City home. Read on for the 24 New York restaurants that made this year’s ranking of America’s 101 best, and for our separate ranking of New York's best steakhouses, click here.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.


New York City Restaurant Cookbooks by Lauren Lampasone, Senior Librarian, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library (SNFL) April 27, 2013

There are lots of reasons to want to recreate favorite restaurant recipes at home. A happy memory of a meal, maybe at a place that no longer exists the pure challenge of replicating that mystery sauce or seasoning the desire to be thrifty, cooking in more and eating out less improving cooking skills through imitation. having already had a taste of perfection. Some restaurant meals are just inspirational to the home cook.

Lunchroom and restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, New York. Digital ID 809542 Pinterest, that virtual bulletin board loaded with visuals, is one place to browse for "copycat" recipes. There are also scores of bloggers that set out to do this for all of the popular national chain restaurants. If you're dying for Olive Garden's Fettucini Alfredo, it's not hard to find someone who has already done the research on cheese proportions for you using Google.

Since this is New York, home of some of the best restaurants in the world, my idea was to pull together resources based less on chains and more on the dishes you might want to recreate that are unique to this city. Jacques Torres's chocolate chip cookies. Eleven Madison Park's granola. New York style pizza. The shack burger! I've eaten these things, and honestly I don't know that my homemade attempts can possibly compare. Still, it's fun to try. I am equally interested to learn how to make renowned dishes I haven't had the chance to order yet: Nobu's black cod miso, Frankies Spuntino's Wine-Stewed Prunes and Mascarpone.

I compiled all of the cookbooks I could find that are based on a particular restaurant or group of restaurants under one chef. To be included in this list there have to be actual recipes, but many books also contain narrative describing the history of the place and the owner or chef's vision and food philosophy.

E = Link to E-Book Version
W = Link to Wikipedia entry
M = Link to What's on the Menu?

Russian Tea Room, 150 West 57th Street, Digital ID 2042410 Here are general resources about favorite New York City food and restaurant meals, in reverse chronological order.

  • New York: Capital of Food - 2018
  • Shop Cook Eat New York- 2016
  • Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover's Companion to New York City - 2015
  • Puerto Rican Cuisine in America: Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes(e-book) 2015
  • Women Chefs of New York (e-book) - 2015 - 2014 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2013 (e-book) - 2011 - 2010 - 2009-2013 (e-book) - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 1993 - 1992 - 1986 - 1983 - 1978 - 1939

Here's a handy tip. Unsurprisingly, many of New York's chefs have appeared in the pages of The New York Times over the years, often sharing popular recipes from their restaurants. Using this search box, type in the name of a restaurant, chef, or dish to view only the recipes they have submitted to the paper. Try searching for the keyword "adapted" just to browse some of them.

Have you tried to cook a new dish yourself after enjoying it in a restaurant? Please share your experience in the comments.



Comments:

  1. Kentrell

    Agree, it's remarkable information

  2. Manu

    Yes Attractive women are distracting. Exactly - Tired of critical days - change sex !!!!! Funny Picture caption: “Ass. Front view ”Seven nannies have ... fourteen boobs - fun That's right - No matter how much vodka you take, you still run twice! (wisdom). He put on a slight fright. What is it from? Intereno that Drink seven times - drink once! whether the place of the enema can be changed. Girls lack femininity, and women lack virginity. This is exactly the Sculptural Group: Hercules tearing the mouth of a peeing boy. This cool Badge on a 150-kilogram man ha Progress made sockets inaccessible to most children - the most gifted die. ))) My friend's wife is not a woman for me ... But if she is pretty. ... ... he is not my friend)))

  3. Heammawihio

    It is error.

  4. Akinora

    a Charming answer

  5. Westcot

    Clearly they were wrong ...



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