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Make Your Own Epic Burger Adventure Slideshow

Make Your Own Epic Burger Adventure Slideshow


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December 10, 2010

By

Arthur Bovino

Cheese, Or No Cheese?

Your friend, Chef Chuck Sirloin has an unlimited supply of the world's best beef. He needs your help to figure out all the amazing burgers he can make. Toppings, bread choice, icons reintrepreted, extreme burger eating, these are the only limitations. What burger should you make?

A BURGER WITH CHEESE!

NO CHEESE!

For a Butter-Basted Burger recipe, click here.

No Cheese? You Lose!

A burger without cheese? Chef Chuck Sirloin doesn't like that idea at all, "Sorry, bud. You LOSE!"


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


Do you know what tahini is? Would you like to find out how to make it at home instead of buying pricey jars at the store? We’ll tell you all about tahini, what you can use it for (yes, it’s more than hummus) and show you how you can easily make it at home.

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Mediterranean and Middle East. It’s vegan, gluten-free, tastes nutty, and is simple to make.

Store-bought tahini is usually made from hulled sesame seeds. This is our preference, too, but you can make it from unhulled and sprouted sesame seeds.

Hulled sesame seeds are what you see most often in stores. Here’s a photo of both hulled and unhulled sesame seeds. The hulled seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

Hulled sesame seeds are the lighter color on left. On the right, the unhulled seeds are much darker and still have their hull or outer shell intact.

In our experience, tahini made from unhulled sesame seeds tends to taste more bitter and the tahini does’t get quite as smooth as when it is made from hulled sesame seeds.

Ways to use tahini

Arguably the most well known way to use tahini is when making hummus. Even though we are huge hummus geeks, we use tahini many other ways in our own kitchen.

Here’s a list of suggestions for how to use tahini, other than in hummus.

  • Make Baba Ganoush, an incredible roasted eggplant dip that, dare I say it, might beat out hummus for our favorite dip.
  • Make your own tahini salad dressing. Give this Kale, Bean and Walnut Salad with Tahini Dressing a look.
  • Turn it into a sauce. Give our Dreamy Tahini Sauce a try, which is perfect drizzled over vegetables or meats. I especially love it over Honey Roasted Carrots and drizzled over these Chicken Lettuce Wraps.
  • Serve tahini next to falafel — try our Easy Homemade Falafel Recipe.
  • Use it in dessert. Seriously. Give these Chocolate Chunk Cookies a look.

Once you have tahini in your fridge (it lasts over a month), we bet you will find yourself adding it to a variety of dishes without direction from us!


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