Latest recipes

Russian Organization Sues Vladimir Putin for Destroying Food Imports

Russian Organization Sues Vladimir Putin for Destroying Food Imports

The Society for Protecting the Rights of the Consumer (OZPP) filed a complaint to Russia’s High Court

The Society for Protecting the Rights of the Consumer filed a complaint against Vladimir Putin's order to destroy Western food imports.

A Russian organization is suing Vladimir Putin for destroying imported Western food.

The Society for Protecting the Rights of the Consumer (OZPP) filed a complaint with Russia’s High Court to repeal Putin’s order to destroy these foods, according to Newsweek. A spokesperson from the OZPP told Interfax, “Providing consumers with high quality and safe agricultural produce, cheese and other food products, irrespective of their country of origin, cannot in any way pose a risk or danger to Russia's food security.”

Putin ordered all illegally imported Western foods to be burned last month, following Russia’s ban on these foods in 2014. However, Russia’s president made an exception for caviar.

Russia’s Communist Party proposed a draft law last week to turn the banned foods into state property. They suggested that the state distribute them to refugees and low-income citizens.

“OZPP hopes that the High Court, in looking at this issue, will be guided only by the rule of law,” OZPP’s spokesperson told Interfax, “not out of concern for political aims and take the decision to fulfill our request.”


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Russia Intends to Make Concessions On Some Issues to Gain WTO Entry

MOSCOW -- Russia is prepared to make big concessions to join the World Trade Organization but will resist demands from Europe and the U.S. to open up its market to imported cars and planes, the country's chief trade negotiator said in an interview.

Maxim Medvedkov, who also is deputy economics minister, said the government wanted to keep high import duties to protect struggling domestic car and aircraft manufacturers from western competition. But he said it was ready to allow greater foreign access to Russia's banking and insurance market and to agree to lower levels of state subsidies to agriculture.

"We understand that we have to pay a price for [WTO] accession," he said, "but our partners understand that we'll never pay a price that would be too high for our people and for our industry."

Mr. Medvedkov was speaking before the latest round of talks in Geneva on Russia's bid to join the international trade body, which began Sunday. Since China signed up last year, Russia is the last big country still outside the WTO, and Vladimir Putin has made membership a major goal of his presidency. The bid has received strong backing from the U.S., seen as a reward for Mr. Putin's decision last year to sign up for the Washington-led antiterror alliance.

But there is strong resistance to swift WTO entry from Russian businessmen who fear an inflow of cheap imports could destroy the country's manufacturing base, especially its ailing auto industry. Prominent among them are industrialists like Oleg Deripaska, president of Siberian Aluminum, which has invested heavily in Russia's second-largest carmaker GAZ . SibAl officials fear cheaper foreign cars could put plants like GAZ out of business.


Watch the video: Τι είπε ο Πούτιν στον Τσίπρα μόλις τον υποδέχθηκε (December 2021).